In this social media era, some of our oldest relatives are getting left out

senior living

In this social media era, some of our oldest relatives are getting left out of the baby-picture whirl. I found this with my own mother: While my mom is an avid Facebooker, we would keep ordering up printed pictures for Grandma. And trust me, Grandma wants to see the baby pictures. All of the baby pictures.

The 8-inch, 12.5-ounce GrandPad comes with a wireless charging dock that it sits in and that turns it into a kind of desktop.

The contact books and photo albums are all managed by a caretaking relative with a smartphone, who acts as a sort of gateway between the GrandPad user and the larger internet. All the content gets pushed to the GrandPad through the LTE connection without the user doing anything. Once the caretaker sets up the contact books, though, the GrandPad user can email and call people in it. The tablet can also only be called by people in the contact book, so the caretaker can whitelist doctors, but exclude phone scammers.

The device has powerful, front-facing speakers to act as a speakerphone, and a front-facing camera for video calling. Emails can either be tapped out on an on-screen keyboard, or dictated and sent as voice mails.

The GrandPad isn’t the kind of thing that people buy for themselves; it’s something their relatives buy for them. It’s not for older people who are fine with phones and other tablets—it’s for the technophobic and disconnected.

I can’t think of anything it really competes with. Its success will ultimately come down to whether or not it’s simple enough to appeal to users who are otherwise completely resistant to technology.

Check back for a full review soon.

Thanks everyone for reading

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